AmberToonies
Tools to deconstruct what you think

For the more constructive end, my other blog is
http://AnimatorMama.tumblr.com
VIDEO

animatormama:

As promised! Some original animation for you all. :)

Spent a couple months on this intro to a youth-produced documentary exploring how gender shapes our lives. Original music sung by Lucia Rodriguez and written by the interns at the music program at Canal Alliance in San Rafael. The whole documentary’s coming soon! 

So… what’s your reaction to the message and how it’s illustrated?

LINK

anonmedics:

Since opening an ask box on this site, the main issue people have seemed interested in is how they can become a street medic. Our apologies for not answering sooner and on a more individual basis, but the issue seemed important enough to warrant a larger post. Following is some…

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— Daniell Koepke (via internal-acceptance-movement)

(via missturman)


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Gail Dines

Goddamn so many shots fired. Truth of truths.

(via bad-dominicana)

(Source: reconnect-restore-rewild, via lowereastlife)


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missturman:

This is a list of companies who supposedly hire people with felonies and was posted by an actual friend on Facebook. I’m not sure of the full accuracy, but it’s useful. We know how the PIC works and what happens to those who are lucky enough to survive physically and return to “society.” I hope this can help someone.

missturman:

This is a list of companies who supposedly hire people with felonies and was posted by an actual friend on Facebook. I’m not sure of the full accuracy, but it’s useful. We know how the PIC works and what happens to those who are lucky enough to survive physically and return to “society.” I hope this can help someone.

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elisabethgracebooth:

Marina Abramović.
An Artist’s Life (Manifesto).

1. An artist’s conduct in his life:

  • An artist should not lie to himself or others 
  • An artist should not steal ideas from other artists 
  • An artist should not compromise for themselves or in regards to the art market 
  • An artist should not kill other human beings 
  • An artist should not make themselves into an idol 
  • An artist should not make themselves into an idol 
  • An artist should not make themselves into an idol


2. An artist’s relation to his love life:

  • An artist should avoid falling in love with another artist 
  • An artist should avoid falling in love with another artist 
  • An artist should avoid falling in love with another artist


3. An artist’s relation to the erotic:

  • An artist should develop an erotic point of view on the world 
  • An artist should be erotic 
  • An artist should be erotic 
  • An artist should be erotic


4. An artist’s relation to suffering:

  • An artist should suffer 
  • From the suffering comes the best work 
  • Suffering brings transformation 
  • Through the suffering an artist transcends their spirit 
  • Through the suffering an artist transcends their spirit 
  • Through the suffering an artist transcends their spirit


5. An artist’s relation to depression:

  • An artist should not be depressed 
  • Depression is a disease and should be cured 
  • Depression is not productive for an artist
  • Depression is not productive for an artist 
  • Depression is not productive for an artist


6. An artist’s relation to suicide:

  • Suicide is a crime against life 
  • An artist should not commit suicide 
  • An artist should not commit suicide 
  • An artist should not commit suicide


7. An artist’s relation to inspiration:

  • An artist should look deep inside themselves for inspiration 
  • The deeper they look inside themselves, the more universal they become 
  • The artist is universe 
  • The artist is universe 
  • The artist is universe


8. An artist’s relation to self-control:

  • The artist should not have self-c ontrol about his life 
  • The artist should have total self-control about his work 
  • The artist should not have self-control about his life 
  • The artist should have total self-control about his work


9. An artist’s relation with transparency:

  • The artist should give and receive at the same time 
  • Transparency means receptive 
  • Transparency means to give 
  • Transparency means to receive 
  • Transparency means receptive 
  • Transparency means to give 
  • Transparency means to receive 
  • Transparency means receptive 
  • Transparency means to give 
  • Transparency means to receive


10. An artist’s relation to symbols:

  • An artist creates his own symbols 
  • Symbols are an artist’s language 
  • The language must then be translated 
  • Sometimes it is difficult to find the key 
  • Sometimes it is difficult to find the key 
  • Sometimes it is difficult to find the key


11. An artist’s relation to silence:

  • An artist has to understand silence 
  • An artist has to create a space for silence to enter his work 
  • Silence is like an island in the middle of a turbulent ocean 
  • Silence is like an island in the middle of a turbulent ocean 
  • Silence is like an island in the middle of a turbulent ocean


12. An artist’s relation to solitude:

  • An artist must make time for the long periods of solitude 
  • Solitude is extremely important 
  • Away from home 
  • Away from the studio 
  • Away from family
  • Away from friends 
  • An artist should stay for long periods of time at waterfalls 
  • An artist should stay for long periods of time at exploding volcanoes 
  • An artist should stay for long periods of time looking at the fast running rivers 
  • An artist should stay for long periods of time looking at the horizon where the ocean and sky meet 
  • An artist should stay for long periods of time looking at the stars in the night sky


13. An artist’s conduct in relation to work:

  • An artist should avoid going to the studio every day
  • An artist should not treat his work schedule as a bank employee does 
  • An artist should explore life and work only when an idea comes to him in a dream or during the day as a vision that arises as a surprise 
  • An artist should not repeat himself 
  • An artist should not overproduce 
  • An artist should avoid his own art pollution 
  • An artist should avoid his own art pollution 
  • An artist should avoid his own art pollution


14. An artist’s possessions:

  • Buddhist monks advise that it is best to have nine possessions in their life:

— 1 robe for the summer 
— 1 robe for the winter 
— 1 pair of shoes 
— 1 begging bowl for food 
— 1 mosquito net 
— 1 prayer book 
— 1 umbrella 
— 1 mat to sleep on 
— 1 pair of glasses if needed 

  • An artist should decide for himself the minimum personal possessions they should have
  • An artist should have more and more of less and less 
  • An artist should have more and more of less and less 
  • An artist should have more and more of less and less


15. A list of an artist’s friends:

  • An artist should have friends that lift their spirits 
  • An artist should have friends that lift their spirits 
  • An artist should have friends that lift their spirits


16. A list of an artist’s enemies:

  • Enemies are very important 
  • The Dalai Lama has said that it is easy to have compassion with friends but much more difficult to have compassion with enemies 
  • An artist has to learn to forgive 
  • An artist has to learn to forgive 
  • An artist has to learn to forgive


17. Different death scenarios:

  • An artist has to be aware of his own mortality 
  • For an artist, it is not only important how he lives his life but also how he dies 
  • An artist should look at the symbols of his work for the signs of different death scenarios 
  • An artist should die consciously without fear 
  • An artist should die consciously without fear 
  • An artist should die consciously without fear


18. Different funeral scenarios:

  • An artist should give instructions before the funeral so that everything is done the way he wants it 
  • The funeral is the artist’s last art piece before leaving 
  • The funeral is the artist’s last art piece before leaving 
  • The funeral is the artist’s last art piece before leaving

(via witchybullshit)

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motherground:

Choose the butterfly over the chrysalis.
Choose light, the ballroom, the well-lit restaurant.

You have for lifetimes strummed minor chords
on the coast of a dead sea. Think major, spindrift.

The sex between you and grief is becoming mechanical.

Despite your vestigial sentiments to the contrary,
a scab’s story is much greater than that of a scar.

Your cock is not an umbilical cord, it is your
heart’s mouthpiece. Choose sunrise, please.

It is time to do something that might cause
embarrassment. Let emptiness mother your child.

Put away the map, where we’re going won’t be on it.

There is nothing particularly inspiring about a death wish.

You have learned all there is to learn from the woman in black.

It is time to stop insulting ecstasy. Masochism
is an empty udder. What was is a cipher. Pick
the rose over the injured dove. Pick warm waters.

Attend a circus. Go for the comic. There is nothing
more mediocre than the association of dysfunction with genius.

Indulge in color. Believe me, there is not a problem.
Plumb bright places for new symbols.

Recommendation: study evergreens.
Find me. We have much to talk about.

— john amen

(via guerrillamamamedicine)

PHOTO
lindseydreadfuls:


POLITICAL ARTIST MANIFESTO
(Food for thought)
By Emory Douglas, Artist
1- Don’t be fooled by deception.
2- Don’t be deceitful or corruptible.
3- Know you get more truth from the artists than from bureaucrats.
4- Recognize that art is a powerful too, a language that can be used to Enlighten, Infrom, a guide to Actions.
5- Create art that Recognizes the Oppression of Others, and considers basic quality of life concerns and basic human rights issues. 
6- Create art of social concerns that even a child can understand.
7- The goal should always be the Make the Message Clear.
8- Make an effort to not create political art dealing with social issues just because it’s a cool thing to do.
9- Create art that Challenges the Colonization of the Imagination.
10- Self evaluate ones work, and be open to constructive evaluations from others, be open to making adjustments if you choose to do so and be prepared if necessary to defend and explain what you communicate through your art.
11- Know the rules before you break the rules.
12- Do not lose sight of what the goals are.
- POWER TO THE PEOPLE!

Words to live by
Scanned and transcribed from Slingshot 110

Okay, me reblogging this without comment isn’t fair. I read this on Friday and it fucking electrified me. It’s been throbbing in my brain ever since. Reading through a Slingshot zine from this past summer and riding the Muni… I walked home in a daze and went straight to my sketchbook, grabbed some gluesticks on the way…
Making me feel more and more like any minute now, I’m just gonna shit some truth all over the place.
Oh boy.

lindseydreadfuls:

POLITICAL ARTIST MANIFESTO

(Food for thought)

By Emory Douglas, Artist

1- Don’t be fooled by deception.

2- Don’t be deceitful or corruptible.

3- Know you get more truth from the artists than from bureaucrats.

4- Recognize that art is a powerful too, a language that can be used to Enlighten, Infrom, a guide to Actions.

5- Create art that Recognizes the Oppression of Others, and considers basic quality of life concerns and basic human rights issues. 

6- Create art of social concerns that even a child can understand.

7- The goal should always be the Make the Message Clear.

8- Make an effort to not create political art dealing with social issues just because it’s a cool thing to do.

9- Create art that Challenges the Colonization of the Imagination.

10- Self evaluate ones work, and be open to constructive evaluations from others, be open to making adjustments if you choose to do so and be prepared if necessary to defend and explain what you communicate through your art.

11- Know the rules before you break the rules.

12- Do not lose sight of what the goals are.

- POWER TO THE PEOPLE!

Words to live by

Scanned and transcribed from Slingshot 110

Okay, me reblogging this without comment isn’t fair. I read this on Friday and it fucking electrified me. It’s been throbbing in my brain ever since. Reading through a Slingshot zine from this past summer and riding the Muni… I walked home in a daze and went straight to my sketchbook, grabbed some gluesticks on the way…

Making me feel more and more like any minute now, I’m just gonna shit some truth all over the place.

Oh boy.

(via animatormama)

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animatormama:

I wait all week for Mondays!

At 8:30 Pacific, Grinder’s Grooveyard plays rare soul 45’s from the ’50s and ’60s. Beautiful sides you’ve never heard, and some old favorites here and there. Lots of doo-wop.

Sweet sweet sounds, I wish you all could hear them.

The DJ Rockin’ Jim is such a trove of knowledge on these musical gems, and always gives interesting background (without cutting too much into the tunes).

Listen tonight! It goes until 11:30 PM, and sometimes later.

Listen online here: http://kpoo.com/hearus.html

Or hear them on your dial in San Francisco, at 89.5 FM.

Support real live human DJ’s! Support human knowledge, hidden histories, vinyl preservation, Black-owned radio stations… listen to KPOO!

Are you listening to this??? :) :) :)

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Lamont Lilly: Dr. Cuevas, as only the second individual I know to describe themselves as Afro-Mexican can you share some insight on the cultural connections that exist within such a powerful ethic mix? And why have figures such as Gaspar Yanga and Emiliano Zapata been omitted from history’s reference of heralded freedom fighters?

Marco Polo Hernández-Cuevas: Well, the reason you haven’t heard many refer to themselves as Afro-Mexican is because this is a relatively new term that was first coined by Eurocentric scholars like Melville Herskovits. It was Gonzalo Aguirre Beltrán who coined it in 1945 in Mexico City, during the foundational meeting of the Institute for African American Studies. However, that doesn’t mean that a color consciousness didn’t exist in Mexico. Prior to that, we had a host of names such as “Casta,” “Chilango,” “Jarocho,” and “Boshito,” all terms that refer to the lack of blood cleanliness of non-white persons. That would explain why many people in Mexico do not identify themselves as Afro-Mexican. They refer to themselves as Casta, or any of the other names previously mentioned. Recently however, there’s been a movement in the South Pacific side of Mexico whereby Afro-Mexicans do not want to be called Afro-Mexican. They just want to be called Nĕgro — Black. It erases the science and intellectuality of such embedded complexities.

In the case of Gaspar Yanga, his omission from history obviously has to do with the revolt he led in the late 16th and early 17th centuries against the Spaniards. Mexico did not actually exist at that time, and the Spanish rulers were not eager to historicize such pursuits of freedom. Yanga and others went against their rule. Only after Gonzalo Aguirre Beltrán did Mexicans become aware in the early 1970s that the town of San Lorenzo de Los Negros would be called Yanga (in honor of this Afro warrior). So we know there was an African presence in the region.

As for Emiliano Zapata, he has actually not been omitted from history. Though not as celebrated here, Emiliano Zapata is a very prominent and well-known revolutionary. He’s one of the people who fought in the area of Morelos, a southern part of Mexico, during the Mexican Revolution. What is omitted from history is Zapata’s African descent. He was an Afro-Mexican. This can be proven even beyond appearances by the fact that his motto was that the land belongs to the people who work it. This is a millenary Bantu way of thinking, that may be as old as a couple million years.

— I’ve heard about the Afro-Mexicans through the work of Black photographer Tony Gleaton back in the 90s. Lamont Lilly’s interview with Dr. Marco Polo Hernández-Cuevas on the R today is a great history lesson on African identities in Mexico and Afropolitanism. (via racialicious)

(via guerrillamamamedicine)